Being a Player Coach: Is it the best or the worst of both worlds?

Andy Budd
5 min readOct 29, 2020

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At some stage in your design career, you may find yourself at a bit of a crossroads. One path is the path of the craftsperson; a path you’re very experienced and comfortable with. Down the other path is the lure of management, and all the power and riches that entails. If you’re lucky enough to work at a cool Silicon Valley tech company, there’s a clear process for choosing either path. You can decide to be an individual contributor (IC) or a manager, and — in theory at least — the choice you make won’t have an effect on your earning potential or career prospects. For everybody else, management typically means a higher salary, a higher status and more upwards mobility. However it also means doing a job you have no previous experience in, and will probably suck at for the next few years. So rather than a crossroads, it can often feel like a precipice.

As a designer transitioning into management, it feels like the sensible thing to do is to find a middle path; a role where you can still be doing day-to-day design, while looking after a handful of designers. This is often described as being a player-coach; somebody who leads their team from the pitch rather than the sidelines. So you look around for roles and end up joining an exciting sounding company as their first design leader. Happy days. Or so you think. Jump forwards 6 months and you’re wondering if you’ve made some terrible mistake. Maybe design leadership isn’t for you, and life would be better if you admit defeat and go back to being an individual contributor?

This is an all too predictable story I see repeating time and time again, so what went wrong?

I see three major challenges — and one big benefit — of becoming a player coach, so let’s start with the benefit. These player-coach jobs are easier to land for people transitioning into management because they generally don’t require prior management experience. The world is full of companies looking to build out their design teams, but lack the understanding to know what skills are needed. So rather than paying for an experienced manager, they try and get two people for the price of one. This results in them hiring somebody to be both a designer and a design leader, presuming they can do the management bit in the gaps between shipping.

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Andy Budd

Design Founder, speaker, start-up advisor & coach. @Seedcamp Venture Partner. Formerly @Clearleft @LDConf & @UXLondon . Trainee Pilot. Ex shark-wrangler.